Monthly Archives: November 2014

Linking Ancient People, Places, Objects and Texts

Linking Ancient People, Places, Objects and Texts
a round table discussion
Gabriel Bodard (KCL), Daniel Pett (British Museum), Humphrey Southall (Portsmouth), Charlotte Tupman (KCL); with response by Eleanor Robson (UCL)

18:00, Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014
Anatomy Museum, Strand Building 6th Floor
(http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/campuses/download/KBLevel6forweb.pdf)
King’s College London, Strand London WC2R 2LS

As classicists and ancient historians have become increasingly reliant on large online research tools over recent years, it has become ever more imperative to find ways of integrating those tools. Linked Open Data (LOD) has the potential to leverage both the connectivity, accessibility and universal standards of the Web, and the power, structure and semantics of relational data. This potential is being used by several scholars and projects in the area of ancient world and historical studies. The SNAP:DRGN project (snapdrgn.net) is using LOD to bring together many technically varied databases and authorities lists of ancient persons into a single virtual authority file; the Pleiades gazetteer and service projects such as Pelagios and PastPlace are creating open vocabularies for historical places and networks of references to them. Museums and other heritage institutions are at the forefront of work to encode semantic archaeological and material culture data, and projects such as Sharing Ancient Wisdoms (ancientwisdoms.ac.uk) and the Homer Multitext (homermultitext.org) are developing citation protocols and an ontology for relating texts with variants, translations and influences.

The panel will introduce some of these key projects and concepts, and then the audience will be invited to participate in open discussion of the issues and potentials of Linked Ancient World Data.

Book Launch: Digital Asset Ecosystems – Rethinking Crowds and Clouds

You are invited to a Book Launch:

Digital Asset Ecosystems – Rethinking Crowds and Clouds

Tobias Blanke, Senior Lecturer, Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London

25th November, KCL, London, 6-8pm

Anatomy Museum, King’s Building, K6.29, King’s College London
Strand, London WC2R 2LS

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You are invited to a book launch for Tobias Blanke’s “Digital Asset Ecosystems – Rethinking Crowds and Clouds”

As a part of the event, DDH will host a seminar-discussion about the book, led by:

· Professor Sheila Anderson, Professor of e-Research, Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London: Sheila has published on data and information management and preservation, digital research repositories and the application of e-Science technologies for arts and humanities research.

· Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Professor of International Relations, Royal Holloway, University of London: Ben is co-director of the New Political Communication Unit and Co-Editor of the Sage journal Media, War & Conflict. Ben’s expertise is in the field of international political communication. Through a number of projects, books and articles he has explored how politics and security are changing in the new media ecology.

· Dr Claudia Aradau, Reader in International Politics, Department of War Studies, King’s College London: Claudia’s research has explored security practices globally and has critically interrogated their political effects. She is the editor of Security Dialogue and has published widely on critical security studies, risk and has recently worked on crowds and the datafication of security.

Refreshments will be provided.

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About the book and author:

Digital asset management is undergoing a fundamental transformation. Near universal availability of high-quality web-based assets makes it important to pay attention to the new world of digital ecosystems and what it means for managing, using and publishing digital assets. This new book by KCL Senior Lecturer Tobias Blanke, entitled “The Ecosystem of Digital Assets” reflects on these developments and what the emerging ‘web of things’ could mean for digital assets. It looks to the future of digital asset management, focussing on the next generation web, and includes up-to date developments in the field, crowd sourcing, and cloud services.

Tobias Blanke, the author, has a background in philosophy and computer science, and is currently is director of the MA in Digital Asset and Media Management for DDH. He leads several DH projects including ones involving open-source optical character recognition, open linked data, and scholarly primitives to document mining and information extraction for research. He is one of the directors of the Digital Research Infrastructure for Arts and Humanities (DARIAH), a European initiative to create an integrated research infrastructure for arts, humanities and culture heritage data, and leads research work for EHRC, an pan-European consortium to build a European Holocaust Research Infrastructure.

Seminar: Text Mining for Digital Humanities

Text Mining for Digital Humanities

Professor Timo Honkela (presented by Tuula Pääkkönen)
National Library of Finland, Helsinki
http://users.ics.aalto.fi/tho/
Tuesday, 11 November 2014, 6.00 pm
Anatomy Museum, Strand Building 6th Floor,
King’s College London, Strand London WC2R 2LS
Abstract
With the increased availability of texts in electronic form, text mining has become commonplace as an attempt to extract interesting, relevant and/or novel information from text collections in an automatic or a semi-automatic manner. Text mining tasks include, for example, categorization, clustering, topic modelling, named entity recognition, taxonomy and conceptual model creation, sentiment analysis, and document summarization. The majority of text mining research has focused on corpora that have been born digital. However, for humanities and social sciences, the digitisation and analysis of originally printed or handwritten documents is essential. These documents may contain even a large proportion of OCR errors which has to be taken into account in the subsequent analytical processes. In this presentation, text mining of historical documents is discussed in some detail. Attention is paid to the  methodological challenges caused by the noisy data, and to the future possibilities related to multilinguality and context-sensitive analysis of large collections.
 
Bio
From the beginning of 2014, professor Timo Honkela works at the Department of Modern Languages, University of Helsinki, and the National Library of Finland, Center for Preservation and Digitisation in the area of digital humanities. Before this he was the head of the Computational Cognitive Systems research group at Aalto University School of Science. With close to 200 scientific publications, Honkela has a long experience in applying statistical machine learning methods for modeling linguistic and socio-cognitive phenomena. Specific examples include leading the development of the GICA method for analyzing subjectivity of understanding, an initiating role in the development of the Websom method for visual information retrieval and text mining, and collaboration with professor George Legrady in creating Pockets Full of Memories, an interactive museum installation. Lesser known work include statistical analysis of Shakespeare’s sonnets, historical interviews, and climate conference talks, and analysis of philosophical and religious conceptions.
 
(Unfortunately, at the last minute Prof Honkela finds himself unable to be with us for his presentation.  Thus, it will instead be given by his colleague Tuula Pääkkönen).

 

Transformative Works Discussion Group

The inaugural meeting of Transformative Works Discussion Group will be *5:30, November 6th* in the Department of Digital Humanities Seminar room (second level of the KCL, Drury Lane building). We hope that the discussion group will then continue on the first Thursday of each month.

In honour of Halloween, the meeting will include a presentation: “Non-humanity Never Looked So Good: Romance From the Long Tail to the Long Tentacle”.

Anyone (students, researchers, staff etc) who has an interest in the area of fandom and transformative works, whether text, image, film, audio or transmedia, or the communities/technology that surround them are invited to attend. We hope that this discussion group will give people working in this area a chance to exchange information and ideas in a friendly, interdisciplinary setting. To this end we would also like to give people an opportunity to volunteer to do a short presentation of their work or nominate a paper for review and discussion. If you are interested in presenting or nominating a discussion topic then please email faith.lawrence@kcl.ac.uk.

Please circulate this information around your departments and to anyone else you think might be interested as these early meetings will be vital to gauging ongoing viability.