Monthly Archives: January 2015

CFP: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts

Conference: “On the Same Page: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts”

Date: Monday 18th – Tuesday 19th May 2015

Venue: King’s College London, Strand

Organised by: Departments of Digital Humanities and Theology & Religious Studies
Co-sponsor: Centre for Late Antique & Medieval studies, King’s College London

We are delighted to announce the Call for Papers for “On the Same Page: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts”. This two-day conference will explore the potential for the computer-assisted study of Hebrew manuscripts, present developments in the field and share methodologies. Of course, for any of that to happen, we need some papers, so please see below for details of how to submit a proposal.

Confirmed speakers include:

Malachi Beit-Arié (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
Marc Michael Epstein (Vassar College)
Ben Outhwaite (Cambridge University Library)
Colette Sirat (Institut de Recherche et d’Histoire des Textes)

How to propose a paper

Papers of 20 minutes in length are invited on any aspect of digital approaches to the study of (medieval) Hebrew manuscripts.

Below are some possible topics, but please don’t feel limited to these:

  • the practical and theoretical consequences of the use of digital images
  • visualisation of manuscript evidence and data
  • examples of research into Hebrew manuscripts that would benefit from a Digital Humanities approach
  • computer-assisted study of iconography
  • is our increasing reliance upon digital surrogates changing our research methodologies and practices?
  • reports from projects that make use of digitised images

To propose a paper, please email a brief abstract (250 words max.) to
sephardipal@lists.cch.kcl.ac.uk

The deadline for the receipt of submissions is close of play on Friday 27th February 2015. Notice of acceptance will be sent as soon after that date as possible.

Very much looking forward to hearing from you,

Stewart Brookes and Debora Matos

Digital Classicist London 2015 call for papers

The Digital Classicist London seminars provide a forum for research into the ancient world that employs innovative digital and interdisciplinary methods. The seminars are held on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London, WC1E 7HU.

We are seeking contributions from students as well as established researchers and practitioners. We welcome papers discussing individual projects and their immediate contexts, but also wish to accommodate the broader theoretical considerations of the use of digital methods in the study of the ancient world, including ancient cultures beyond the classical Mediterranean. You should expect a mixed audience of classicists, philologists, historians, archaeologists, information scientists and digital humanists, and take particular care to cater for the presence of graduate students in the audience.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of no more than 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight GMT on March 8th, 2015.

Organised by Gabriel Bodard, Stuart Dunn, Simon Mahony and Charlotte Tupman. Further information and details of past seminars, including several peer-reviewed publications, are available at: http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/

Digital Codex Mendoza online

Ernesto Miranda, a former student on the MA in Digital Humanities here at DDH, has just published a digital edition of the Codex Mendoza, a sixteenth-century manuscript that is now one of our most important sources for pre-Hispanic culture in Mexico. The project began life as an assignment for one of his MA modules, ‘Material Culture of the Book’, for which students had to plan how they would digitise a book or set of books. After graduating, Ernesto took his plan to Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History, the Bodleian Library in Oxford, University of California Press, and King’s College London, and convinced them all to help him actually do it.

The edition is now freely available both online and as an app on the iTunes store, and has already been featured in the New York Times (among others). It allows you not only to view the pages of this famous and fascinating manuscript, but also to see in situ transcriptions, translations and supplementary material. See, for instance, this page on daily life (drag your mouse over the image to see the translation), or this one with annotations on territorial expansion.

Part of the project press-release is quoted below which gives some more background to the project. But now go, explore and enjoy!

The digital resource was created in collaboration with Bodleiain Library, Oxford, (where it has been held since 1659), King’s College London and University of California Press. It was developed in 2014, under the curatorial direction of Frances Berdan and Baltazar Brito.

The Codex Mendoza was created under the orders of Viceroy Antonio de Mendoza in 1542 to evoke an economic, political, and social panorama of the recently conquered lands. It has 72 illustrated pages glossed in Nahuatl, and 63 correspondent pages with Spanish glosses.

The Digital Codex Mendoza is part of INAH’s effort to highlight the importance of Mexican Codices for national history. This effort began in September, 2014, with the opening of the unprecedented exhibition, Códices de México, Memorias y Saberes, where 44 codices were shown for the first time to the general public. Codices are extremely sensitive documents in terms of preservation, so very few people have access to them. This is why the exhibition and the digital edition of codices held outside Mexico, such as Digital Codex Mendoza, are so important.

This effort is the first of a series that will virtually repatriate essential Mexican documents. It serves as a milestone regarding academic digital editions in Mexico and Latin America. Through this work the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (INAH), or National Institute of Anthropology and History, demonstrates the broad-based utility of this type of edition and the need to seek new forms of representation for such complex systems of knowledge. At the same time, the effort furthers the permanent calling of the INAH to study, preserve, and spread awareness of the cultural patrimony of the Mexican people, and create new ways of engagement with cultural heritage.

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 20-24, 2015

We invite applications for a 5-day training workshop on digital editing of epigraphic and papyrological texts, to be held in the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, April 20-24, 2015. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (KCL), Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig) and Charlotte Tupman (KCL). There will be no charge for the workshop, but participants should arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a community of practice and guidance for using TEI XML for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including Inscriptions of Aphrodisias, Vindolanda Tablets Online, Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri and Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri, and is also being used by Perseus Digital Library and EAGLE Europeana Project. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions in TEI, identifying and linking to external person and place authorities, and use of the tags-free Papyrological Editor (papyri.info/editor).

No technical skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek or Latin, epigraphy or papyrology, and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors and professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email simona.stoyanova@informatik.uni-leipzig.de with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant background and experience, by Friday February 27th, 2015.

Digital Humanities seminar, spring 2015

The Digital Humanities research seminar will run fortnightly, on Tuesday evenings during term, in the Anatomy Museum on the Strand campus (with one exception, on February 5, which is a lunchtime meeting in the Drury Lane 2nd floor seminar room). We hope to discuss the place of DH within the arts and humanities and within the academy as a whole. All are welcome.

When: 18:15 start (except Feb 5, 12, Mar 10, 20)
Where: Anatomy Museum, Strand Building 6th Floor
(http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/campuses/download/KBLevel6forweb.pdf)
King’s College London, Strand London WC2R 2LS (except Feb 5/Mar 10/Mar 20)

January 20, 2015:
Richard Gartner, Giles Greenway, Faith Lawrence, Jennifer Pybus (King’s College London)
Round table: Big Data in the Digital Humanities

February 5 (NB: Thursday, 13:00 start, in 26-29 Drury Lane, room 212):
Clare Hooper (University of Southampton IT Innovation Centre)
Understanding Disciplinary Presence in Interdisciplinary Fields: analysing contributions in the Digital Humanities and Web Science

February 12 (NB: Thursday, 14:00 start, in 26-29 Drury Lane, room 212):
Michael Lesk (Rutgers)
The Convergence of Curation

February 17:
Ségolène Tarte (University of Oxford)
Of Features and Models: A reflexive account of image processing experiences across classics and trauma surgery
(Joint seminar with Classics Department)

March 3:
Julianne Nyhan (University College London)
Were Humanists and Digital Humanities always so very different? An investigation of the earliest contributions to Humanist

March 10 (NB: 17:30 start, in Council Room K2.29):
Irene Polinskaya (KCL), Askold Ivantchik (Bordeaux) & Gabriel Bodard (KCL)
Byzantine Inscriptions of the Northern Black Sea (details)

March 17:
Marilyn Deegan, Simon Tanner (KCL), Sam Rayner (UCL), et alii.
Panel: Future of the Academic Book

March 20 (NB: Friday, 12:30 start, in 26-29 Drury Lane, room 212):
Nicole Coleman (Stanford)
Palladio: Visual Tools for Thinking Through Data