All posts by Gabriel Bodard

Digital Classics Training: Structuring and visualising data

Digital Classics Workshop:
Structuring and visualising data

Thursday November 5, 10:30 – 17:30
Institute of Classical Studies
Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

51_357ba541-ff3d-4ad1-8884-72279ac0b1e0The Institute of Classical Studies is offering a one-day training workshop for postgraduate students and researchers on structuring and visualising historical data. The workshop will offer a basic introduction to issues around tabular data, database design and linked open data, and tools for visualisation for both presentational and analytical purposes. Participants will gain hands-on experience of creating database tables (in Google Spreadsheets), cleaning and enhancing their data, and building visualisations based on it using a variety of free sites and tools. We shall suggest and discuss how these methods can be applicable to your research.

No previous digital experience is required, but participants should bring their own laptop and have an account on Google Drive and be prepared to download some free software in advance of the workshop. The workshop will be taught by Silke Vanbeselaere (KU Leuven) and Gabriel Bodard (ICS). This workshop has been made possible by the generous support of the LAHP and AHRC.

Registration is free.
To book a place on the workshop, please contact
Valerie James (valerie.james@sas.ac.uk)

Workshop: 3D cultural heritage and landscape

Digital Classics Workshop
3D approaches to cultural heritage and landscape

Thursday, September 24
Institute of Classical Studies
Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

The Institute of Classical Studies is offering a training workshop for postgraduate students and researchers on the use of 3D approaches in the study of cultural heritage artefacts and landscapes. The workshop will offer a basic introduction to the principles behind 3D imaging, modelling and representation of terrain and elevation, and how these can be used in research as well as visualisation. It will also give participants hands-on experience using simple and free software packages to produce complete 3D models and visualisations, with methods easily transferable to their own research.

No previous digital experience is required, but participants should bring a laptop and a digital camera or smartphone and be prepared to install some free software in advance of the workshop. This workshop has been made possible by the generous support of the LAHP and AHRC, and staff from KCL.

Registration is free.
To book a place on the workshop, please contact Valerie James (valerie.james@sas.ac.uk)

Digital Classicist seminar by MA DH students (Friday July 3)

The Pedagogical Value of Postgraduate Involvement in Digital Humanities Departmental Projects

Francesca Giovannetti, Asmita Jain, Ethan Jean-Marie, Paul Kasay, Emma King, Theologis Strikos, Argula Rublack, Kaijie Ying (King’s College London)

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies seminar 2015

Friday July 3rd at 16:30, in Room 212, 26-29 Drury Lane, King’s College London, WC2B 5RL

The SNAP (Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies) Project at King’s College London, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) under the Digital Transformations big data scheme, seeks to act as a centralized portal for the study of ancient prosopographies. It links together dispersed, heterogeneous prosopographical datasets into a single collection. It will model a simple structure using Web and Linked data technologies to represent relationships between databases and to link from references in primary texts to authoritative lists of persons and names. By doing so it particularly addresses the issue of overlapping data between different prosopographical indexes. It has used as its starting point three large datasets from the classical world – the Lexicon of Greek Personal Names, Trismegistos, and the Prosopographia Imperii Romani – and aims to eventually be a comprehensive focal point for prosopographical information about the ancient world.

A team of voluntary postgraduate students from the department of Digital Humanities at King’s College London has been involved in the further development of certain parts of the project, which build upon the skills learnt in the offered Masters Degrees. These include coding tasks with Python, RDF, SPARQL queries and improvements to the final HTML pages as well as administrative tasks such as communicating and negotiating with potential contributors for the expansion of the dataset.

This initiative provides the students with the opportunity to apply these skills to a large scale project beyond the usual scope of the assignments related to the Masters Degrees. It gives the opportunity to experience how a team of digital humanists work towards a common objective. This offers a more well-rounded perspective of how the different components involved in a digital humanities project interact with and mutually support each other. The talk will be analysing the pedagogical value of these initiatives for postgraduate students approaching the work world or continued academic study.

ALL WELCOME

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

DH/Classics seminar: Perseus, Open Philology and Greco-Roman studies for the 21st century

Digital Humanities and Classics Research Seminar

Wednesday June 24th, 18:00
Room K3.11, Strand Campus, King’s College London, WC2R 2LS

Professor Gregory Crane
Universität Leipzig and Tufts University
Perseus, Open Philology and Greco-Roman studies for the 21st century

ALL WELCOME

Professor Crane is the Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Digital Humanities at Leipzig, and the Winnick Family Chair of Technology and Entrepreneurship and Professor of Classics at Tufts University. He completed his doctorate in classical philology at Harvard University. From 1985, he was involved in planning the Perseus Project as a co-director and is now its Editor-in-Chief. He has received, among others, the Google Digital Humanities Award 2010 for his work in the field.

Digital Classicist London seminar 2015

Summer 2015 programme

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies seminars

Meetings are on Fridays at 16:30 in room G21A*, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

(*except June 14 in Room 348; June 26 and July 3, not in ICS—see below)

ALL WELCOME

Seminars will be followed by refreshments

Follow or discuss the seminars on Twitter at #DigiClass.

Jun 5 Jen Hicks (UCL) From lost archives to digital databases (abstract)
Jun 12 Leif Isaksen, Pau de Soto (Southampton), Elton Barker (Open University) and Rainer Simon (Vienna) Pelagios and Recogito: an annotation platform for joining a linked data world (abstract) Rm 348
Jun 19 Emma Payne (UCL) Digital comparison of 19th century plaster casts and original classical sculptures (abstract)
Jun 26 Various speakers (names and titles tba) (in UCL)
Jul 3 Francesca Giovannetti, Asmita Jain, Ethan Jean-Marie, Paul Kasay, Emma King, Theologis Strikos, Argula Rublack and Kaijie Ying (King’s College London) The Pedagogical Value of Postgraduate Involvement in Digital Humanities Departmental Projects (abstract tha) (in KCL)
Jul 10 Monica Berti, Gregory R. Crane (Leipzig), Kenny Morrell (Center for Hellenic Studies) Sunoikisis DC – An International Consortium of Digital Classics Programs (abstract)
Jul 17 Hugh Cayless (Duke) Integrating Digital Epigraphies (IDEs) (abstract)
Jul 24 Saskia Peels (Liège) A Collection of Greek Ritual Norms Project (CGRN) (abstract)
Jul 31 Federico Aurora (Oslo) DAMOS – Database of Mycenaean at Oslo (abstract)
Aug 7 Usama Gad (Heidelberg) Graecum-Arabicum-Latinum Encoded Corpus (GALEN©) (abstract)
Aug 14 Sarah Hendriks (Oxford) Digital technologies and the Herculaneum Papyri (abstract)

(Organised by Gabriel Bodard, Hugh Bowden, Stuart Dunn, Simon Mahony and Charlotte Tupman.)

DH Seminar: Julianne Nyhan, Investigation of earliest contributions to Humanist

Were Humanists and Digital Humanities always so very different? An investigation of the earliest contributions to Humanist

Julianne Nyhan (University College London)

When: Tuesday March 3rd, 18:15 start
Where: Anatomy Museum, Strand Building 6th Floor (http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/campuses/download/KBLevel6forweb.pdf), King’s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS

Abstract: Until recently the history of Digital Humanities has, with a few notable exceptions (see, for example, relevant entries in the bibliography that I’m in the process of compiling here: https://hiddenhistories.omeka.net/resources) mostly been neglected by the DH community as well as by the mainstream Humanities. Of the many research questions that wait to be addressed, one set pertains to the history of the disciplinary formation of Digital Humanities. What processes, attitudes and circumstances (not to mention knowledge and expertise) conspired, and in what ways, to make it possible for DH to become disciplined in the ways that it has (and not in other ways)? What might answers to such questions contribute to new conversations about the forms that DH might take in the future? Here I will make a first and brief contribution to answering such far-reaching questions by identifying and analysing references to disciplinary identity that occur in conversations conducted via the Humanist Listserv in its inaugural year.

About Dr Nyhan: Dr Julianne Nyhan is lecturer in Digital Information Studies in the Department of Information Studies, University College London. Her research interests include the history of computing in the Humanities, Oral history and most aspects of digital humanities. Her recent publications include the co-edited Digital Humanities in Practice (Facet 2012) and Digital Humanities: a Reader (Ashgate 2013). She is at work on a book (Springer Verlag 2015) on the history of Digital Humanities (information about the wider Hidden Histories project is here https://hiddenhistories.omeka.net/). Having recently completed a number of interviews with the female keypunch operators who were trained by Roberto Busa in the 1950s and 1960s to work on the Index Thomisticus project she is also at work on a paper about this (see http://archelogos.hypotheses.org/135)  Among other things, she is a member of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Peer Review College, the communications Editor of Interdisciplinary Science Reviews and a member of various other editorial and advisory boards. She tweets @juliannenyhan and blogs at http://archelogos.hypotheses.org/. Further information is available here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/dis/people/juliannenyhan

Invitation to Explore the Digital Humanities

The following survey from Clare Hooper (IT Innovation Centre, Southampton), who spoke in the Digital Humanities seminar this afternoon, will contribute to her ongoing work analysing the disciplinary and thematic contributions to DH from a combination of quantitative study of published papers and response from experts. Full survey at https://www.isurvey.soton.ac.uk/14422

An Invitation to Explore the Digital Humanities

Can you spare time to help our understanding of the Digital Humanities? I’m doing a disciplinary analysis of research contributions in DH. As part of the work, I’m seeking expert input on what disciplines are represented by certain keywords. I’d be most grateful for your input.

If you have any questions, please contact me, Clare Hooper, via email: cjh@it-innovation.soton.ac.uk. Please also let me know if you’d like to be kept informed about the results of this work.

Many thanks for your time!

—Clare Hooper

CFP: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts

Conference: “On the Same Page: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts”

Date: Monday 18th – Tuesday 19th May 2015

Venue: King’s College London, Strand

Organised by: Departments of Digital Humanities and Theology & Religious Studies
Co-sponsor: Centre for Late Antique & Medieval studies, King’s College London

We are delighted to announce the Call for Papers for “On the Same Page: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts”. This two-day conference will explore the potential for the computer-assisted study of Hebrew manuscripts, present developments in the field and share methodologies. Of course, for any of that to happen, we need some papers, so please see below for details of how to submit a proposal.

Confirmed speakers include:

Malachi Beit-Arié (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
Marc Michael Epstein (Vassar College)
Ben Outhwaite (Cambridge University Library)
Colette Sirat (Institut de Recherche et d’Histoire des Textes)

How to propose a paper

Papers of 20 minutes in length are invited on any aspect of digital approaches to the study of (medieval) Hebrew manuscripts.

Below are some possible topics, but please don’t feel limited to these:

  • the practical and theoretical consequences of the use of digital images
  • visualisation of manuscript evidence and data
  • examples of research into Hebrew manuscripts that would benefit from a Digital Humanities approach
  • computer-assisted study of iconography
  • is our increasing reliance upon digital surrogates changing our research methodologies and practices?
  • reports from projects that make use of digitised images

To propose a paper, please email a brief abstract (250 words max.) to
sephardipal@lists.cch.kcl.ac.uk

The deadline for the receipt of submissions is close of play on Friday 27th February 2015. Notice of acceptance will be sent as soon after that date as possible.

Very much looking forward to hearing from you,

Stewart Brookes and Debora Matos

Digital Classicist London 2015 call for papers

The Digital Classicist London seminars provide a forum for research into the ancient world that employs innovative digital and interdisciplinary methods. The seminars are held on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London, WC1E 7HU.

We are seeking contributions from students as well as established researchers and practitioners. We welcome papers discussing individual projects and their immediate contexts, but also wish to accommodate the broader theoretical considerations of the use of digital methods in the study of the ancient world, including ancient cultures beyond the classical Mediterranean. You should expect a mixed audience of classicists, philologists, historians, archaeologists, information scientists and digital humanists, and take particular care to cater for the presence of graduate students in the audience.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of no more than 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight GMT on March 8th, 2015.

Organised by Gabriel Bodard, Stuart Dunn, Simon Mahony and Charlotte Tupman. Further information and details of past seminars, including several peer-reviewed publications, are available at: http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 20-24, 2015

We invite applications for a 5-day training workshop on digital editing of epigraphic and papyrological texts, to be held in the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, April 20-24, 2015. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (KCL), Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig) and Charlotte Tupman (KCL). There will be no charge for the workshop, but participants should arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a community of practice and guidance for using TEI XML for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including Inscriptions of Aphrodisias, Vindolanda Tablets Online, Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri and Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri, and is also being used by Perseus Digital Library and EAGLE Europeana Project. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions in TEI, identifying and linking to external person and place authorities, and use of the tags-free Papyrological Editor (papyri.info/editor).

No technical skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek or Latin, epigraphy or papyrology, and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors and professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email simona.stoyanova@informatik.uni-leipzig.de with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant background and experience, by Friday February 27th, 2015.