Category Archives: conference

Registration Opens for DigiPal V: Wednesday 2nd September 2015

Dear all,

It is with great delight that the DigiPal team at the Department of Digital Humanities (King’s College London) invite you to attend the fifth DigiPal Symposium at King’s on Wednesday 2nd September 2015.

As usual, the focus of the Symposium will be the computer-assisted study of medieval handwriting and manuscripts. Papers will cover on-line learning resources for palaeography, crowdsourcing Ælfric, image processing techniques for  studying manuscripts, codicology, the Exon Domesday book and medieval Scottish charters.

Speakers will include:

  •  Ben Albritton (Stanford): “Digital Abundance, or: What Do We Do with All this Stuff?”
  • Francisco J. Álvarez López (Exeter/King’s College London): “Scribal Collaboration and Interaction in Exon Domesday: A DigiPal Approach”
  • Stewart Brookes (King’s College London): “Charters, Text and Cursivity: Extending DigiPal’s Framework for Models of Authority”
  • Ainoa Castro Correa (King’s College London): “VisigothicPal: The Quest Against Nonsense”
  • Orietta Da Rold (Cambridge): “‘I pray you that I may have paupir, penne, and inke’: Writing on Paper in the Late Medieval Period”
  • Christina Duffy (British Library): “Effortless Image Processing: How to Get the Most Out of your Digital Assets with ImageJ”
  • Kathryn Lowe (Glasgow)
  • Maayan Zhitomirsky-Geffet (Bar-Ilan University) and Gila Prebor (Bar-Ilan University): “Towards an Ontopedia for Hebrew Manuscripts”
  • Leonor Zozaya: “Educational Innovation: New Digital Games to Complement the Learning of Palaeography”
  • Plus a roundtable with Arianna Ciula (Roehampton), Peter Stokes (King’s College London) and Dominique Stutzmann (Institut de recherche et d’histoire des textes).

Registration is free and includes refreshments and sandwiches.
It’s easy: just sign-up with Eventbrite: https://digipal-v.eventbrite.com

For further details, please visit http://www.digipal.eu/blog/digipal2015/

And, in case that wasn’t enough palaeography for one early September, the following day there’s also the  “The Image of Cursive Handwriting: A One Day Workshop”, with David Ganz, Teresa Webber, Irene Ceccherini, David Rundle and Marc Smith. To register, visit http://www.modelsofauthority.ac.uk/blog/cursivity-workshop/

Very much looking forward to seeing you in September, at one or both events,

Stewart Brookes and Peter Stokes

Dr Stewart J Brookes
Department of Digital Humanities
King’s College London

Registration Opens for “Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts” at KCL…

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We are delighted to announce the programme for On the Same Page: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts at King’s College London. This two-day conference will explore the potential for the computer-assisted study of Hebrew manuscripts; discuss the intersection of Jewish Studies and Digital Humanities; and share methodologies. Amongst the topics covered will be Hebrew palaeography and codicology, the encoding and transcription of Hebrew texts, the practical and theoretical consequences of the use of digital surrogates and the visualisation of manuscript evidence and data. For the full programme and our Call for Posters, please see below.

Registration for the conference is free. As places are limited, we recommend registering at an early point to avoid disappointment. To register, please click on this link: https://on-the-same-page.eventbrite.com

Refreshments will be provided, but attendees should make their own arrangements for lunch.

Very much looking forward to seeing you in May,

Stewart Brookes, Debora Matos, Andrea Schatz and Peter Stokes

Organised by the Departments of Digital Humanities and Theology & Religious Studies (Jewish Studies)
Co-sponsor: Centre for Late Antique & Medieval Studies (CLAMS), King’s College London

Call for Posters
Are you involved in an interesting project in the wider field of Jewish Studies? Would you like to have a presence at the conference even though you’re not giving a paper? If so, then you might like to consider submitting a poster which summarises the objectives, significance and outcomes of your research project. We’ll display posters throughout the conference and if you attend with your poster, then you can talk about your work with attendees during the lunch breaks. Display space is limited, so please send a brief summary (max. 100 words) of your research/project to sephardipal@lists.cch.kcl.ac.uk. The deadline for the receipt of submissions is Thursday 30th April 2015. Notice of acceptance will be sent as soon as possible after that date.

Conference Programme 

Monday 18th May 2015

8.45 – Coffee and registration

9.15 – Welcome

  • Stewart Brookes and Débora Matos (King’s College London)

9.30 – Keynote lecture

  • Chair: Andrea Schatz (King’s College London)
  • Colette Sirat (École Pratique des Hautes Études): The Study of Medieval Manuscripts in a Technological World

10.30 – Coffee/Tea

11.00 – Session 1: Digital Libraries: From Manuscripts to Images

  • Chair: tbc
  • Ilana Tahan (British Library): The Hebrew Manuscripts Digitisation Project at the British Library: An Assessment
  • César Merchán-Hamann (Bodleian Library): The Polonsky Digitisation Project: Hebrew Materials
  • Emile Schrijver (Bibliotheca Rosenthaliana/University of Amsterdam): The Real Challenges of Mass Digitization for Hebrew Manuscript Research

12.30 – Lunch break

13.30 – Session 2: (Roundtable): Digital Images: Scale and Scope

  • Chair: Jonathan Stökl (King’s College London)
  • Rahel Fronda (University of Oxford): From Micrography to Macrography: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Script
  • Ilana Wartenberg (UCL): Digital Images in the Research of Medieval Hebrew Scientific Treatises
  • Estara Arrant (University of Oxford): Foundations, Errors, and Innovations: Jacob Mann’s Genizah Research and the Use of Digitised Images in Hebrew Manuscript Analysis
  • Dalia-Ruth Halperin (Talpiot College of Education, Holon): Choreography of the Micrography

15.00 – Coffee/Tea

15.30 – Session 3: Digital Space: Joins and Links

  • Chair: Paul Joyce (King’s College London)
  • Sacha Stern (UCL): The Calendar Dispute of 921/2: Assembling a Corpus of Manuscripts from the Friedberg Genizah Project
  • Israel Sandman (UCL): Manuscript Images: Revealing the History of Transmission and Use of Literary Works
  • Judith Kogel (CNRS, Paris): How to Use Internet and Digital Resources to Identify Hebrew Fragments

17.00 – Keynote lecture

  • Chair: Stewart Brookes (King’s College London)
  • Judith Olszowy-Schlanger (École Pratique des Hautes Études): The Books Within Books Database and Its Contribution to Hebrew Palaeography

Tuesday 19th May 2015

9.15 – Keynote lecture

  • Chair: Peter Stokes (King’s College London)
  • Malachi Beit-Arié (Hebrew University of Jerusalem): The SfarData Codicological Database: A Tool for Dating and Localizing Medieval Codices, Historical Research and the Study of Book Production – Methodology and Practice

10.15 – Session 4: Digital Palaeography: Tools and Methods

  • Chair: Julia Crick (King’s College London)
  • Débora Matos (King’s College London): Building Digital Tools for Hebrew Palaeography: The SephardiPal Database
  • Stewart Brookes (King’s College London): A Test-Case for Extending SephardiPal: The Montefiore Mainz Mahzor

11.15 – Coffee/Tea

11.45 – Session 5: Digital Corpora: Analysis and Editing

  • Chair: Eyal Poleg (Queen Mary University of London)
  • Ben Outhwaite (Cambridge University Library): Beyond the Aleppo Codex: Why the Hebrew Bible Deserves a Better Internet
  • Daniel Stökl Ben Ezra (École Pratique des Hautes Études), co-author Hayim Lapin (University of Maryland): A Digital Edition of the Mishna: From Images to Facsimile, Text and Grammatical Analysis
  • Nachum Dershowitz (Tel Aviv University), co-author Lior Wolf (Tel Aviv University): Computational Hebrew Manuscriptology

13.15 – Lunch break

14.30 – Keynote lecture

  • Chair: Débora Matos (King’s College London)
  • Edna Engel (The Hebrew Palaeography Project, Israel): Hebrew Palaeography in the Digital Age

15.30 – Session 6: Data and Metadata

  • Chair: tbc
  • Sinai Rusinek (The Polonsky Academy at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute): Digitally Reading from Right to Left
  • Yoed Kadary (Ben Gurion University): The Challenges of Metadata Mining in Digital Humanities Projects

16.30 – Concluding roundtable

17.00 – Refreshments

The conference convenors would like to thank the Departments of Digital Humanities and Theology & Religious Studies as well as the Faculty of Arts & Humanities and the Centre for Late Antique and Medieval Studies at King’s College London for their generous support. With thanks to the Free Library of Philadelphia Rare Book Department for permission to use the image from Lewis O 140 (The Masoretic Bible of Portugal). Photograph courtesy of Débora Matos.

 

 

 

CFP: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts

Conference: “On the Same Page: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts”

Date: Monday 18th – Tuesday 19th May 2015

Venue: King’s College London, Strand

Organised by: Departments of Digital Humanities and Theology & Religious Studies
Co-sponsor: Centre for Late Antique & Medieval studies, King’s College London

We are delighted to announce the Call for Papers for “On the Same Page: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts”. This two-day conference will explore the potential for the computer-assisted study of Hebrew manuscripts, present developments in the field and share methodologies. Of course, for any of that to happen, we need some papers, so please see below for details of how to submit a proposal.

Confirmed speakers include:

Malachi Beit-Arié (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
Marc Michael Epstein (Vassar College)
Ben Outhwaite (Cambridge University Library)
Colette Sirat (Institut de Recherche et d’Histoire des Textes)

How to propose a paper

Papers of 20 minutes in length are invited on any aspect of digital approaches to the study of (medieval) Hebrew manuscripts.

Below are some possible topics, but please don’t feel limited to these:

  • the practical and theoretical consequences of the use of digital images
  • visualisation of manuscript evidence and data
  • examples of research into Hebrew manuscripts that would benefit from a Digital Humanities approach
  • computer-assisted study of iconography
  • is our increasing reliance upon digital surrogates changing our research methodologies and practices?
  • reports from projects that make use of digitised images

To propose a paper, please email a brief abstract (250 words max.) to
sephardipal@lists.cch.kcl.ac.uk

The deadline for the receipt of submissions is close of play on Friday 27th February 2015. Notice of acceptance will be sent as soon after that date as possible.

Very much looking forward to hearing from you,

Stewart Brookes and Debora Matos

DH2014: SNAP:DRGN poster

Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies: Data and Relation in Greco-Roman Names

(This poster was also presented in the Ontologies for Prosopography pre-conference workshop on Tuesday July 8.)

In the poster session on Thursday July 10, this was up for two hours, was photographed several times, and Sebastian Rahtz and myself mostly chatted with many people who came over and expressed an interest in it. At least two, possibly three, of these people will turn out to be new project partners who we wouldn’t have known about otherwise, so I call this a win!

If you want to see the poster in full-size, you can find it on the wall in Drury Lane, in the corridor opposite room 220.

SNAP:DRGN consultation workshop

Last week we held the first workshop of the SNAP:DRGN (Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies: Data and Relations in Greco-roman Names) project, here in King’s College London.

As announced in our press release the SNAP:DRGN project aims to recommend standards for linking together basic identities and information about the entities in various person-databases relating to the ancient world, with a view to facilitating the production of a federated network including millions of ancient person-records, compatible with the Linked Ancient World Data graph. At this workshop (see Workshop slides and recap) we presented our preliminary proposals, data models and ontology for feedback to a representative group of scholars from both the classical prosopography/onomaastics and Linked Open Data communities. We also spoke to several people with large datasets that might be contributed to the SNAP graph.

It was decided that SNAP:DRGN will attempt to address recommendations to five key use-cases of networked prosopographical data:

  1. Putting prosopographical data online, including stable URIs and openly-accessible data and metadata in standard formats (not defined by us).
  2. Contibuting a summary of said data, including identifiers for all persons and a simplifed subset of core identifying information about each entity, to the SNAP graph to that it can be built upon and referred to by other projects.
  3. Annotating SNAP entities to establish alignment and identify co-references between related datasets.
  4. Marking-up online documents to identify personal names within them to persons identified in the SNAP graph and its constituent databases.
  5. Adding relationships between persons, both within and between databases: person X is the daughter of person Y; person A in one database was killed in battle by person B in another database.

The SNAP:DRGN project will continue to work on the “Cookbook“, the summary of recommendations and examples for these five use-cases, over the coming months, in the run-up to adding several new datasets to the graph. We are also experimenting in a modest way with tool and implementations for working with the vast graph of ancient persons created: named entity recognition (NER) workflows for finding new personal names in texts; co-reference resolution for finding overlap and links between datasets; search and browse tools and APIs. This work will be reported on the SNAP:DRGN blog, and in conferences and seminars throughout the year.

Reporting from MEX 2013

I recently struggled to get back into writing, whether for lack of time or for the ability to focus on one single subject. And that’s why it took me so long to report back about my experience at MEX, last September.

MEX is a conference about mobile user experience that happens periodically in London. As they put it themselves:

MEX is an event focused on user modes as the raw ingredients of digital experience across phones, tablets, PCs, wearables and more. Learn from expert speakers, develop skills & ideas in facilitated creative sessions and gain lifelong access to a network of fellow pioneers.

I applied for a scholarship and, luckily enough, I was granted a place.

The round of speakers was pretty impressive and I was looking forward to find out more about the latest in the field.

My goals

Since I have only recently started to approach UX in a more didactic way rather than instinctively (Finally! You say, I agree), I wanted to find out:

  • How much of what I do by instinct is right and how much is wrong
  • How do you sell UX to a client?
  • How much psychology is involved?
  • Tips on how to approach UX

The talks

★★★☆☆

I enjoyed Sofia Svanteson and Per Nordqvist‘s enthusiasm while presenting their ‘Explore’ talk, on how task based interactions are becoming limited, they only work when a user has a specific goal to achieve. James Taplin told us how technology and focus on UX can help improve the world promoting the ‘Principal Sustainability’. I learnt how much easier could the process of learning be, when you get the UX right, as Arun Vasudeva showcased some examples of rich content integration in education.
The interesting concept of co-creation was mentioned by Lennart Andersson, while Ben Pirt showed us how badly UX is implemented in hardware design! Where is the power button?
Jason DaPonte talked about his Sunday Drive app and hinted at the still unutilised potentials to integrate UI with existing devices (car navigation systems in this case).
Then we learnt how the majority of young users don’t listen to digital music in a ‘traditional’ way anymore, they prefer platforms like YouTube, Spotify, Grooveshark and how this generates an opportunity for developing a new design and offer a different experience. As Brittney Bean introduced us to her new project Songdrop between a joke and the other.

After all this information in one single day I wasn’t sure I could absorb more on day 2, but I did.

I discovered my inner (Forrest) Gump, as James Haliburton put it. How our receptive mode depends on context and spontaneity and how indeterminate and non-committal it can be.
Amy Huckfield intends to improve the life of children with ADHD with her research ‘Children with ADHD: The untapped Well of Future Creatives’, basically helping the child re-engage and re-focus after losing attention through an interactive wristband.
Rich Clayton explains how his Travel Time app could help business analyse their geographic data in an affordable way, because time could be more important than distance.
And finally Davide “Folletto” Casali tells us that 70% of the projects fail because of lack of users’ acceptance. We tend to adapt the tools we have, rather then look for the right ones to satisfy our needs, even when developing. To quote Bruno Munari:
“Complicare è semplice. Semplificare è difficile.” (To complicate is easy. To simplify is difficult.)

The ‘Creative sessions’

I didn’t particularly enjoy the Creative Sessions. Attendees were split in groups and were supposed to discuss and explore different topics. I was in the Create group and to date I am not sure what our objectives were. Maybe the topic was too broad. We ended up starting various interesting conversations on how to define a currency other than money to help potential users (we had set our target on students as an example), but we ended up with few ideas on a platform that could help with this currency exchange rather than an idea on how to enhance creation through user experience.

Conclusions

I find myself using a fairly common approach to user experience design, although I wasn’t aware I was doing it. That means there is a lot of room for improvement and definitely UX is becoming a conscious part of my design since stage one of sketching from now on.

Is UX changing?
Yes, it is. User are getting ‘smarter’ and UX needs to adapt quickly and continuously. Fairly obvious, but it’s because it’s obvious that it’s easy to forget. It’s not just the devices that are changing, users are too.
People want rich(-er) content, they look for it, feeling like they are making their own choices, but they do look for guidance and good UX design can be that guide.

Off topic things I learnt

The th sound is really a challenge for us Italians (I hope Davide “Folletto” Casali won’t get offended by this comment).
But I also learnt that the letter j makes Scandinavians struggle.