Category Archives: Digital Classicist

Digital Classics Training: Structuring and visualising data

Digital Classics Workshop:
Structuring and visualising data

Thursday November 5, 10:30 – 17:30
Institute of Classical Studies
Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

51_357ba541-ff3d-4ad1-8884-72279ac0b1e0The Institute of Classical Studies is offering a one-day training workshop for postgraduate students and researchers on structuring and visualising historical data. The workshop will offer a basic introduction to issues around tabular data, database design and linked open data, and tools for visualisation for both presentational and analytical purposes. Participants will gain hands-on experience of creating database tables (in Google Spreadsheets), cleaning and enhancing their data, and building visualisations based on it using a variety of free sites and tools. We shall suggest and discuss how these methods can be applicable to your research.

No previous digital experience is required, but participants should bring their own laptop and have an account on Google Drive and be prepared to download some free software in advance of the workshop. The workshop will be taught by Silke Vanbeselaere (KU Leuven) and Gabriel Bodard (ICS). This workshop has been made possible by the generous support of the LAHP and AHRC.

Registration is free.
To book a place on the workshop, please contact
Valerie James (valerie.james@sas.ac.uk)

Digital Classicist seminar by MA DH students (Friday July 3)

The Pedagogical Value of Postgraduate Involvement in Digital Humanities Departmental Projects

Francesca Giovannetti, Asmita Jain, Ethan Jean-Marie, Paul Kasay, Emma King, Theologis Strikos, Argula Rublack, Kaijie Ying (King’s College London)

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies seminar 2015

Friday July 3rd at 16:30, in Room 212, 26-29 Drury Lane, King’s College London, WC2B 5RL

The SNAP (Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies) Project at King’s College London, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) under the Digital Transformations big data scheme, seeks to act as a centralized portal for the study of ancient prosopographies. It links together dispersed, heterogeneous prosopographical datasets into a single collection. It will model a simple structure using Web and Linked data technologies to represent relationships between databases and to link from references in primary texts to authoritative lists of persons and names. By doing so it particularly addresses the issue of overlapping data between different prosopographical indexes. It has used as its starting point three large datasets from the classical world – the Lexicon of Greek Personal Names, Trismegistos, and the Prosopographia Imperii Romani – and aims to eventually be a comprehensive focal point for prosopographical information about the ancient world.

A team of voluntary postgraduate students from the department of Digital Humanities at King’s College London has been involved in the further development of certain parts of the project, which build upon the skills learnt in the offered Masters Degrees. These include coding tasks with Python, RDF, SPARQL queries and improvements to the final HTML pages as well as administrative tasks such as communicating and negotiating with potential contributors for the expansion of the dataset.

This initiative provides the students with the opportunity to apply these skills to a large scale project beyond the usual scope of the assignments related to the Masters Degrees. It gives the opportunity to experience how a team of digital humanists work towards a common objective. This offers a more well-rounded perspective of how the different components involved in a digital humanities project interact with and mutually support each other. The talk will be analysing the pedagogical value of these initiatives for postgraduate students approaching the work world or continued academic study.

ALL WELCOME

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

DH/Classics seminar: Perseus, Open Philology and Greco-Roman studies for the 21st century

Digital Humanities and Classics Research Seminar

Wednesday June 24th, 18:00
Room K3.11, Strand Campus, King’s College London, WC2R 2LS

Professor Gregory Crane
Universität Leipzig and Tufts University
Perseus, Open Philology and Greco-Roman studies for the 21st century

ALL WELCOME

Professor Crane is the Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Digital Humanities at Leipzig, and the Winnick Family Chair of Technology and Entrepreneurship and Professor of Classics at Tufts University. He completed his doctorate in classical philology at Harvard University. From 1985, he was involved in planning the Perseus Project as a co-director and is now its Editor-in-Chief. He has received, among others, the Google Digital Humanities Award 2010 for his work in the field.

Digital Classicist London 2015 call for papers

The Digital Classicist London seminars provide a forum for research into the ancient world that employs innovative digital and interdisciplinary methods. The seminars are held on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London, WC1E 7HU.

We are seeking contributions from students as well as established researchers and practitioners. We welcome papers discussing individual projects and their immediate contexts, but also wish to accommodate the broader theoretical considerations of the use of digital methods in the study of the ancient world, including ancient cultures beyond the classical Mediterranean. You should expect a mixed audience of classicists, philologists, historians, archaeologists, information scientists and digital humanists, and take particular care to cater for the presence of graduate students in the audience.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of no more than 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight GMT on March 8th, 2015.

Organised by Gabriel Bodard, Stuart Dunn, Simon Mahony and Charlotte Tupman. Further information and details of past seminars, including several peer-reviewed publications, are available at: http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 20-24, 2015

We invite applications for a 5-day training workshop on digital editing of epigraphic and papyrological texts, to be held in the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, April 20-24, 2015. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (KCL), Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig) and Charlotte Tupman (KCL). There will be no charge for the workshop, but participants should arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a community of practice and guidance for using TEI XML for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including Inscriptions of Aphrodisias, Vindolanda Tablets Online, Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri and Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri, and is also being used by Perseus Digital Library and EAGLE Europeana Project. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions in TEI, identifying and linking to external person and place authorities, and use of the tags-free Papyrological Editor (papyri.info/editor).

No technical skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek or Latin, epigraphy or papyrology, and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors and professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email simona.stoyanova@informatik.uni-leipzig.de with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant background and experience, by Friday February 27th, 2015.

Linking Ancient People, Places, Objects and Texts

Linking Ancient People, Places, Objects and Texts
a round table discussion
Gabriel Bodard (KCL), Daniel Pett (British Museum), Humphrey Southall (Portsmouth), Charlotte Tupman (KCL); with response by Eleanor Robson (UCL)

18:00, Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014
Anatomy Museum, Strand Building 6th Floor
(http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/campuses/download/KBLevel6forweb.pdf)
King’s College London, Strand London WC2R 2LS

As classicists and ancient historians have become increasingly reliant on large online research tools over recent years, it has become ever more imperative to find ways of integrating those tools. Linked Open Data (LOD) has the potential to leverage both the connectivity, accessibility and universal standards of the Web, and the power, structure and semantics of relational data. This potential is being used by several scholars and projects in the area of ancient world and historical studies. The SNAP:DRGN project (snapdrgn.net) is using LOD to bring together many technically varied databases and authorities lists of ancient persons into a single virtual authority file; the Pleiades gazetteer and service projects such as Pelagios and PastPlace are creating open vocabularies for historical places and networks of references to them. Museums and other heritage institutions are at the forefront of work to encode semantic archaeological and material culture data, and projects such as Sharing Ancient Wisdoms (ancientwisdoms.ac.uk) and the Homer Multitext (homermultitext.org) are developing citation protocols and an ontology for relating texts with variants, translations and influences.

The panel will introduce some of these key projects and concepts, and then the audience will be invited to participate in open discussion of the issues and potentials of Linked Ancient World Data.

Digital Classicist CFP (2014)

The Digital Classicist London seminars have since 2006 provided a forum for research into the ancient world that employs digital and other quantitative methods. The seminars, hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies, are on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in Senate House, London.

We welcome contributions from students as well as from established researchers and practitioners. We welcome high-quality papers discussing individual projects and their immediate context, but also accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in Classical studies. The content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information specialists or digital humanists, and should have an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of approximately 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight UTC on March 9th, 2014.

Further information and details of past seminars are available at: http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/index.html

Digital Classicist Call For Papers

My, how time flies! Already the Digital Classicist Summer Seminar Series is about to celebrate its fifth birthday — and just look how it’s grown!

Don’t miss your chance to celebrate the colloquium’s meteoric rise from young punk upstart to pillar of the digital scene: answer the Call For Papers below!

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Digital Classicist Seminars (London, 2011)

(Please circulate widely–we welcome
proposals from students as well as established researchers.)

Call for Presentations

The Digital Classicist will once more be running a series of seminars in
Summer 2011, on the subject of research into the ancient world that has
an innovative digital component. Themes could include, but are by no
means limited to, visualization, information and data linking, digital
textual and linguistic studies, and geographic information and network
analysis; so long as the content is likely to be of interest both to
classicists/ancient historians/archaeologists and information
scientists/digital humanists, and would be considered serious research
in at least one of those fields.

The seminars run on Friday afternoons (16:30 – 19:00) from June to
mid-August in Senate House, London, and are hosted by the Institute of
Classical Studies (University of London). In previous years collected
papers from the DC WiP seminars have been published in an online special
issue of Digital Medievalist, a printed volume from Ashgate Press, a
BICS supplement (in production), and the last three years have been
released as audio podcasts. We have had expressions of interest in
further print volumes from more than one publisher.

We have a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within
the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international
presenters to attend, so please enquire).

Please send a 300-500 word abstract to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by April
15th, 2011. We shall announce the full program at the end of April.

http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/index.html

(Coörganised by Will Wootton, Charlotte Tupman, Matteo Romanello, Simon
Mahony, Timothy Hill, Alejandro Giacometti, Juan Garcés, Stuart Dunn &
Gabriel Bodard.)