Category Archives: Digital Humanities

Registration Opens for DigiPal V: Wednesday 2nd September 2015

Dear all,

It is with great delight that the DigiPal team at the Department of Digital Humanities (King’s College London) invite you to attend the fifth DigiPal Symposium at King’s on Wednesday 2nd September 2015.

As usual, the focus of the Symposium will be the computer-assisted study of medieval handwriting and manuscripts. Papers will cover on-line learning resources for palaeography, crowdsourcing Ælfric, image processing techniques for  studying manuscripts, codicology, the Exon Domesday book and medieval Scottish charters.

Speakers will include:

  •  Ben Albritton (Stanford): “Digital Abundance, or: What Do We Do with All this Stuff?”
  • Francisco J. Álvarez López (Exeter/King’s College London): “Scribal Collaboration and Interaction in Exon Domesday: A DigiPal Approach”
  • Stewart Brookes (King’s College London): “Charters, Text and Cursivity: Extending DigiPal’s Framework for Models of Authority”
  • Ainoa Castro Correa (King’s College London): “VisigothicPal: The Quest Against Nonsense”
  • Orietta Da Rold (Cambridge): “‘I pray you that I may have paupir, penne, and inke’: Writing on Paper in the Late Medieval Period”
  • Christina Duffy (British Library): “Effortless Image Processing: How to Get the Most Out of your Digital Assets with ImageJ”
  • Kathryn Lowe (Glasgow)
  • Maayan Zhitomirsky-Geffet (Bar-Ilan University) and Gila Prebor (Bar-Ilan University): “Towards an Ontopedia for Hebrew Manuscripts”
  • Leonor Zozaya: “Educational Innovation: New Digital Games to Complement the Learning of Palaeography”
  • Plus a roundtable with Arianna Ciula (Roehampton), Peter Stokes (King’s College London) and Dominique Stutzmann (Institut de recherche et d’histoire des textes).

Registration is free and includes refreshments and sandwiches.
It’s easy: just sign-up with Eventbrite: https://digipal-v.eventbrite.com

For further details, please visit http://www.digipal.eu/blog/digipal2015/

And, in case that wasn’t enough palaeography for one early September, the following day there’s also the  “The Image of Cursive Handwriting: A One Day Workshop”, with David Ganz, Teresa Webber, Irene Ceccherini, David Rundle and Marc Smith. To register, visit http://www.modelsofauthority.ac.uk/blog/cursivity-workshop/

Very much looking forward to seeing you in September, at one or both events,

Stewart Brookes and Peter Stokes

Dr Stewart J Brookes
Department of Digital Humanities
King’s College London

Registration Opens for “Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts” at KCL…

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We are delighted to announce the programme for On the Same Page: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts at King’s College London. This two-day conference will explore the potential for the computer-assisted study of Hebrew manuscripts; discuss the intersection of Jewish Studies and Digital Humanities; and share methodologies. Amongst the topics covered will be Hebrew palaeography and codicology, the encoding and transcription of Hebrew texts, the practical and theoretical consequences of the use of digital surrogates and the visualisation of manuscript evidence and data. For the full programme and our Call for Posters, please see below.

Registration for the conference is free. As places are limited, we recommend registering at an early point to avoid disappointment. To register, please click on this link: https://on-the-same-page.eventbrite.com

Refreshments will be provided, but attendees should make their own arrangements for lunch.

Very much looking forward to seeing you in May,

Stewart Brookes, Debora Matos, Andrea Schatz and Peter Stokes

Organised by the Departments of Digital Humanities and Theology & Religious Studies (Jewish Studies)
Co-sponsor: Centre for Late Antique & Medieval Studies (CLAMS), King’s College London

Call for Posters
Are you involved in an interesting project in the wider field of Jewish Studies? Would you like to have a presence at the conference even though you’re not giving a paper? If so, then you might like to consider submitting a poster which summarises the objectives, significance and outcomes of your research project. We’ll display posters throughout the conference and if you attend with your poster, then you can talk about your work with attendees during the lunch breaks. Display space is limited, so please send a brief summary (max. 100 words) of your research/project to sephardipal@lists.cch.kcl.ac.uk. The deadline for the receipt of submissions is Thursday 30th April 2015. Notice of acceptance will be sent as soon as possible after that date.

Conference Programme 

Monday 18th May 2015

8.45 – Coffee and registration

9.15 – Welcome

  • Stewart Brookes and Débora Matos (King’s College London)

9.30 – Keynote lecture

  • Chair: Andrea Schatz (King’s College London)
  • Colette Sirat (École Pratique des Hautes Études): The Study of Medieval Manuscripts in a Technological World

10.30 – Coffee/Tea

11.00 – Session 1: Digital Libraries: From Manuscripts to Images

  • Chair: tbc
  • Ilana Tahan (British Library): The Hebrew Manuscripts Digitisation Project at the British Library: An Assessment
  • César Merchán-Hamann (Bodleian Library): The Polonsky Digitisation Project: Hebrew Materials
  • Emile Schrijver (Bibliotheca Rosenthaliana/University of Amsterdam): The Real Challenges of Mass Digitization for Hebrew Manuscript Research

12.30 – Lunch break

13.30 – Session 2: (Roundtable): Digital Images: Scale and Scope

  • Chair: Jonathan Stökl (King’s College London)
  • Rahel Fronda (University of Oxford): From Micrography to Macrography: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Script
  • Ilana Wartenberg (UCL): Digital Images in the Research of Medieval Hebrew Scientific Treatises
  • Estara Arrant (University of Oxford): Foundations, Errors, and Innovations: Jacob Mann’s Genizah Research and the Use of Digitised Images in Hebrew Manuscript Analysis
  • Dalia-Ruth Halperin (Talpiot College of Education, Holon): Choreography of the Micrography

15.00 – Coffee/Tea

15.30 – Session 3: Digital Space: Joins and Links

  • Chair: Paul Joyce (King’s College London)
  • Sacha Stern (UCL): The Calendar Dispute of 921/2: Assembling a Corpus of Manuscripts from the Friedberg Genizah Project
  • Israel Sandman (UCL): Manuscript Images: Revealing the History of Transmission and Use of Literary Works
  • Judith Kogel (CNRS, Paris): How to Use Internet and Digital Resources to Identify Hebrew Fragments

17.00 – Keynote lecture

  • Chair: Stewart Brookes (King’s College London)
  • Judith Olszowy-Schlanger (École Pratique des Hautes Études): The Books Within Books Database and Its Contribution to Hebrew Palaeography

Tuesday 19th May 2015

9.15 – Keynote lecture

  • Chair: Peter Stokes (King’s College London)
  • Malachi Beit-Arié (Hebrew University of Jerusalem): The SfarData Codicological Database: A Tool for Dating and Localizing Medieval Codices, Historical Research and the Study of Book Production – Methodology and Practice

10.15 – Session 4: Digital Palaeography: Tools and Methods

  • Chair: Julia Crick (King’s College London)
  • Débora Matos (King’s College London): Building Digital Tools for Hebrew Palaeography: The SephardiPal Database
  • Stewart Brookes (King’s College London): A Test-Case for Extending SephardiPal: The Montefiore Mainz Mahzor

11.15 – Coffee/Tea

11.45 – Session 5: Digital Corpora: Analysis and Editing

  • Chair: Eyal Poleg (Queen Mary University of London)
  • Ben Outhwaite (Cambridge University Library): Beyond the Aleppo Codex: Why the Hebrew Bible Deserves a Better Internet
  • Daniel Stökl Ben Ezra (École Pratique des Hautes Études), co-author Hayim Lapin (University of Maryland): A Digital Edition of the Mishna: From Images to Facsimile, Text and Grammatical Analysis
  • Nachum Dershowitz (Tel Aviv University), co-author Lior Wolf (Tel Aviv University): Computational Hebrew Manuscriptology

13.15 – Lunch break

14.30 – Keynote lecture

  • Chair: Débora Matos (King’s College London)
  • Edna Engel (The Hebrew Palaeography Project, Israel): Hebrew Palaeography in the Digital Age

15.30 – Session 6: Data and Metadata

  • Chair: tbc
  • Sinai Rusinek (The Polonsky Academy at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute): Digitally Reading from Right to Left
  • Yoed Kadary (Ben Gurion University): The Challenges of Metadata Mining in Digital Humanities Projects

16.30 – Concluding roundtable

17.00 – Refreshments

The conference convenors would like to thank the Departments of Digital Humanities and Theology & Religious Studies as well as the Faculty of Arts & Humanities and the Centre for Late Antique and Medieval Studies at King’s College London for their generous support. With thanks to the Free Library of Philadelphia Rare Book Department for permission to use the image from Lewis O 140 (The Masoretic Bible of Portugal). Photograph courtesy of Débora Matos.

 

 

 

Invitation to Explore the Digital Humanities

The following survey from Clare Hooper (IT Innovation Centre, Southampton), who spoke in the Digital Humanities seminar this afternoon, will contribute to her ongoing work analysing the disciplinary and thematic contributions to DH from a combination of quantitative study of published papers and response from experts. Full survey at https://www.isurvey.soton.ac.uk/14422

An Invitation to Explore the Digital Humanities

Can you spare time to help our understanding of the Digital Humanities? I’m doing a disciplinary analysis of research contributions in DH. As part of the work, I’m seeking expert input on what disciplines are represented by certain keywords. I’d be most grateful for your input.

If you have any questions, please contact me, Clare Hooper, via email: cjh@it-innovation.soton.ac.uk. Please also let me know if you’d like to be kept informed about the results of this work.

Many thanks for your time!

—Clare Hooper

Digital Codex Mendoza online

Ernesto Miranda, a former student on the MA in Digital Humanities here at DDH, has just published a digital edition of the Codex Mendoza, a sixteenth-century manuscript that is now one of our most important sources for pre-Hispanic culture in Mexico. The project began life as an assignment for one of his MA modules, ‘Material Culture of the Book’, for which students had to plan how they would digitise a book or set of books. After graduating, Ernesto took his plan to Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History, the Bodleian Library in Oxford, University of California Press, and King’s College London, and convinced them all to help him actually do it.

The edition is now freely available both online and as an app on the iTunes store, and has already been featured in the New York Times (among others). It allows you not only to view the pages of this famous and fascinating manuscript, but also to see in situ transcriptions, translations and supplementary material. See, for instance, this page on daily life (drag your mouse over the image to see the translation), or this one with annotations on territorial expansion.

Part of the project press-release is quoted below which gives some more background to the project. But now go, explore and enjoy!

The digital resource was created in collaboration with Bodleiain Library, Oxford, (where it has been held since 1659), King’s College London and University of California Press. It was developed in 2014, under the curatorial direction of Frances Berdan and Baltazar Brito.

The Codex Mendoza was created under the orders of Viceroy Antonio de Mendoza in 1542 to evoke an economic, political, and social panorama of the recently conquered lands. It has 72 illustrated pages glossed in Nahuatl, and 63 correspondent pages with Spanish glosses.

The Digital Codex Mendoza is part of INAH’s effort to highlight the importance of Mexican Codices for national history. This effort began in September, 2014, with the opening of the unprecedented exhibition, Códices de México, Memorias y Saberes, where 44 codices were shown for the first time to the general public. Codices are extremely sensitive documents in terms of preservation, so very few people have access to them. This is why the exhibition and the digital edition of codices held outside Mexico, such as Digital Codex Mendoza, are so important.

This effort is the first of a series that will virtually repatriate essential Mexican documents. It serves as a milestone regarding academic digital editions in Mexico and Latin America. Through this work the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (INAH), or National Institute of Anthropology and History, demonstrates the broad-based utility of this type of edition and the need to seek new forms of representation for such complex systems of knowledge. At the same time, the effort furthers the permanent calling of the INAH to study, preserve, and spread awareness of the cultural patrimony of the Mexican people, and create new ways of engagement with cultural heritage.

Digital Humanities seminar, spring 2015

The Digital Humanities research seminar will run fortnightly, on Tuesday evenings during term, in the Anatomy Museum on the Strand campus (with one exception, on February 5, which is a lunchtime meeting in the Drury Lane 2nd floor seminar room). We hope to discuss the place of DH within the arts and humanities and within the academy as a whole. All are welcome.

When: 18:15 start (except Feb 5, 12, Mar 10, 20)
Where: Anatomy Museum, Strand Building 6th Floor
(http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/campuses/download/KBLevel6forweb.pdf)
King’s College London, Strand London WC2R 2LS (except Feb 5/Mar 10/Mar 20)

January 20, 2015:
Richard Gartner, Giles Greenway, Faith Lawrence, Jennifer Pybus (King’s College London)
Round table: Big Data in the Digital Humanities

February 5 (NB: Thursday, 13:00 start, in 26-29 Drury Lane, room 212):
Clare Hooper (University of Southampton IT Innovation Centre)
Understanding Disciplinary Presence in Interdisciplinary Fields: analysing contributions in the Digital Humanities and Web Science

February 12 (NB: Thursday, 14:00 start, in 26-29 Drury Lane, room 212):
Michael Lesk (Rutgers)
The Convergence of Curation

February 17:
Ségolène Tarte (University of Oxford)
Of Features and Models: A reflexive account of image processing experiences across classics and trauma surgery
(Joint seminar with Classics Department)

March 3:
Julianne Nyhan (University College London)
Were Humanists and Digital Humanities always so very different? An investigation of the earliest contributions to Humanist

March 10 (NB: 17:30 start, in Council Room K2.29):
Irene Polinskaya (KCL), Askold Ivantchik (Bordeaux) & Gabriel Bodard (KCL)
Byzantine Inscriptions of the Northern Black Sea (details)

March 17:
Marilyn Deegan, Simon Tanner (KCL), Sam Rayner (UCL), et alii.
Panel: Future of the Academic Book

March 20 (NB: Friday, 12:30 start, in 26-29 Drury Lane, room 212):
Nicole Coleman (Stanford)
Palladio: Visual Tools for Thinking Through Data