Category Archives: events

Digital Classics Training: Structuring and visualising data

Digital Classics Workshop:
Structuring and visualising data

Thursday November 5, 10:30 – 17:30
Institute of Classical Studies
Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

51_357ba541-ff3d-4ad1-8884-72279ac0b1e0The Institute of Classical Studies is offering a one-day training workshop for postgraduate students and researchers on structuring and visualising historical data. The workshop will offer a basic introduction to issues around tabular data, database design and linked open data, and tools for visualisation for both presentational and analytical purposes. Participants will gain hands-on experience of creating database tables (in Google Spreadsheets), cleaning and enhancing their data, and building visualisations based on it using a variety of free sites and tools. We shall suggest and discuss how these methods can be applicable to your research.

No previous digital experience is required, but participants should bring their own laptop and have an account on Google Drive and be prepared to download some free software in advance of the workshop. The workshop will be taught by Silke Vanbeselaere (KU Leuven) and Gabriel Bodard (ICS). This workshop has been made possible by the generous support of the LAHP and AHRC.

Registration is free.
To book a place on the workshop, please contact
Valerie James (valerie.james@sas.ac.uk)

Workshop: 3D cultural heritage and landscape

Digital Classics Workshop
3D approaches to cultural heritage and landscape

Thursday, September 24
Institute of Classical Studies
Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

The Institute of Classical Studies is offering a training workshop for postgraduate students and researchers on the use of 3D approaches in the study of cultural heritage artefacts and landscapes. The workshop will offer a basic introduction to the principles behind 3D imaging, modelling and representation of terrain and elevation, and how these can be used in research as well as visualisation. It will also give participants hands-on experience using simple and free software packages to produce complete 3D models and visualisations, with methods easily transferable to their own research.

No previous digital experience is required, but participants should bring a laptop and a digital camera or smartphone and be prepared to install some free software in advance of the workshop. This workshop has been made possible by the generous support of the LAHP and AHRC, and staff from KCL.

Registration is free.
To book a place on the workshop, please contact Valerie James (valerie.james@sas.ac.uk)

Registration Opens for “Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts” at KCL…

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We are delighted to announce the programme for On the Same Page: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts at King’s College London. This two-day conference will explore the potential for the computer-assisted study of Hebrew manuscripts; discuss the intersection of Jewish Studies and Digital Humanities; and share methodologies. Amongst the topics covered will be Hebrew palaeography and codicology, the encoding and transcription of Hebrew texts, the practical and theoretical consequences of the use of digital surrogates and the visualisation of manuscript evidence and data. For the full programme and our Call for Posters, please see below.

Registration for the conference is free. As places are limited, we recommend registering at an early point to avoid disappointment. To register, please click on this link: https://on-the-same-page.eventbrite.com

Refreshments will be provided, but attendees should make their own arrangements for lunch.

Very much looking forward to seeing you in May,

Stewart Brookes, Debora Matos, Andrea Schatz and Peter Stokes

Organised by the Departments of Digital Humanities and Theology & Religious Studies (Jewish Studies)
Co-sponsor: Centre for Late Antique & Medieval Studies (CLAMS), King’s College London

Call for Posters
Are you involved in an interesting project in the wider field of Jewish Studies? Would you like to have a presence at the conference even though you’re not giving a paper? If so, then you might like to consider submitting a poster which summarises the objectives, significance and outcomes of your research project. We’ll display posters throughout the conference and if you attend with your poster, then you can talk about your work with attendees during the lunch breaks. Display space is limited, so please send a brief summary (max. 100 words) of your research/project to sephardipal@lists.cch.kcl.ac.uk. The deadline for the receipt of submissions is Thursday 30th April 2015. Notice of acceptance will be sent as soon as possible after that date.

Conference Programme 

Monday 18th May 2015

8.45 – Coffee and registration

9.15 – Welcome

  • Stewart Brookes and Débora Matos (King’s College London)

9.30 – Keynote lecture

  • Chair: Andrea Schatz (King’s College London)
  • Colette Sirat (École Pratique des Hautes Études): The Study of Medieval Manuscripts in a Technological World

10.30 – Coffee/Tea

11.00 – Session 1: Digital Libraries: From Manuscripts to Images

  • Chair: tbc
  • Ilana Tahan (British Library): The Hebrew Manuscripts Digitisation Project at the British Library: An Assessment
  • César Merchán-Hamann (Bodleian Library): The Polonsky Digitisation Project: Hebrew Materials
  • Emile Schrijver (Bibliotheca Rosenthaliana/University of Amsterdam): The Real Challenges of Mass Digitization for Hebrew Manuscript Research

12.30 – Lunch break

13.30 – Session 2: (Roundtable): Digital Images: Scale and Scope

  • Chair: Jonathan Stökl (King’s College London)
  • Rahel Fronda (University of Oxford): From Micrography to Macrography: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Script
  • Ilana Wartenberg (UCL): Digital Images in the Research of Medieval Hebrew Scientific Treatises
  • Estara Arrant (University of Oxford): Foundations, Errors, and Innovations: Jacob Mann’s Genizah Research and the Use of Digitised Images in Hebrew Manuscript Analysis
  • Dalia-Ruth Halperin (Talpiot College of Education, Holon): Choreography of the Micrography

15.00 – Coffee/Tea

15.30 – Session 3: Digital Space: Joins and Links

  • Chair: Paul Joyce (King’s College London)
  • Sacha Stern (UCL): The Calendar Dispute of 921/2: Assembling a Corpus of Manuscripts from the Friedberg Genizah Project
  • Israel Sandman (UCL): Manuscript Images: Revealing the History of Transmission and Use of Literary Works
  • Judith Kogel (CNRS, Paris): How to Use Internet and Digital Resources to Identify Hebrew Fragments

17.00 – Keynote lecture

  • Chair: Stewart Brookes (King’s College London)
  • Judith Olszowy-Schlanger (École Pratique des Hautes Études): The Books Within Books Database and Its Contribution to Hebrew Palaeography

Tuesday 19th May 2015

9.15 – Keynote lecture

  • Chair: Peter Stokes (King’s College London)
  • Malachi Beit-Arié (Hebrew University of Jerusalem): The SfarData Codicological Database: A Tool for Dating and Localizing Medieval Codices, Historical Research and the Study of Book Production – Methodology and Practice

10.15 – Session 4: Digital Palaeography: Tools and Methods

  • Chair: Julia Crick (King’s College London)
  • Débora Matos (King’s College London): Building Digital Tools for Hebrew Palaeography: The SephardiPal Database
  • Stewart Brookes (King’s College London): A Test-Case for Extending SephardiPal: The Montefiore Mainz Mahzor

11.15 – Coffee/Tea

11.45 – Session 5: Digital Corpora: Analysis and Editing

  • Chair: Eyal Poleg (Queen Mary University of London)
  • Ben Outhwaite (Cambridge University Library): Beyond the Aleppo Codex: Why the Hebrew Bible Deserves a Better Internet
  • Daniel Stökl Ben Ezra (École Pratique des Hautes Études), co-author Hayim Lapin (University of Maryland): A Digital Edition of the Mishna: From Images to Facsimile, Text and Grammatical Analysis
  • Nachum Dershowitz (Tel Aviv University), co-author Lior Wolf (Tel Aviv University): Computational Hebrew Manuscriptology

13.15 – Lunch break

14.30 – Keynote lecture

  • Chair: Débora Matos (King’s College London)
  • Edna Engel (The Hebrew Palaeography Project, Israel): Hebrew Palaeography in the Digital Age

15.30 – Session 6: Data and Metadata

  • Chair: tbc
  • Sinai Rusinek (The Polonsky Academy at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute): Digitally Reading from Right to Left
  • Yoed Kadary (Ben Gurion University): The Challenges of Metadata Mining in Digital Humanities Projects

16.30 – Concluding roundtable

17.00 – Refreshments

The conference convenors would like to thank the Departments of Digital Humanities and Theology & Religious Studies as well as the Faculty of Arts & Humanities and the Centre for Late Antique and Medieval Studies at King’s College London for their generous support. With thanks to the Free Library of Philadelphia Rare Book Department for permission to use the image from Lewis O 140 (The Masoretic Bible of Portugal). Photograph courtesy of Débora Matos.

 

 

 

CFP: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts

Conference: “On the Same Page: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts”

Date: Monday 18th – Tuesday 19th May 2015

Venue: King’s College London, Strand

Organised by: Departments of Digital Humanities and Theology & Religious Studies
Co-sponsor: Centre for Late Antique & Medieval studies, King’s College London

We are delighted to announce the Call for Papers for “On the Same Page: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts”. This two-day conference will explore the potential for the computer-assisted study of Hebrew manuscripts, present developments in the field and share methodologies. Of course, for any of that to happen, we need some papers, so please see below for details of how to submit a proposal.

Confirmed speakers include:

Malachi Beit-Arié (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
Marc Michael Epstein (Vassar College)
Ben Outhwaite (Cambridge University Library)
Colette Sirat (Institut de Recherche et d’Histoire des Textes)

How to propose a paper

Papers of 20 minutes in length are invited on any aspect of digital approaches to the study of (medieval) Hebrew manuscripts.

Below are some possible topics, but please don’t feel limited to these:

  • the practical and theoretical consequences of the use of digital images
  • visualisation of manuscript evidence and data
  • examples of research into Hebrew manuscripts that would benefit from a Digital Humanities approach
  • computer-assisted study of iconography
  • is our increasing reliance upon digital surrogates changing our research methodologies and practices?
  • reports from projects that make use of digitised images

To propose a paper, please email a brief abstract (250 words max.) to
sephardipal@lists.cch.kcl.ac.uk

The deadline for the receipt of submissions is close of play on Friday 27th February 2015. Notice of acceptance will be sent as soon after that date as possible.

Very much looking forward to hearing from you,

Stewart Brookes and Debora Matos

Digital Classicist London 2015 call for papers

The Digital Classicist London seminars provide a forum for research into the ancient world that employs innovative digital and interdisciplinary methods. The seminars are held on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London, WC1E 7HU.

We are seeking contributions from students as well as established researchers and practitioners. We welcome papers discussing individual projects and their immediate contexts, but also wish to accommodate the broader theoretical considerations of the use of digital methods in the study of the ancient world, including ancient cultures beyond the classical Mediterranean. You should expect a mixed audience of classicists, philologists, historians, archaeologists, information scientists and digital humanists, and take particular care to cater for the presence of graduate students in the audience.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of no more than 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight GMT on March 8th, 2015.

Organised by Gabriel Bodard, Stuart Dunn, Simon Mahony and Charlotte Tupman. Further information and details of past seminars, including several peer-reviewed publications, are available at: http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/

Book Launch: Digital Asset Ecosystems – Rethinking Crowds and Clouds

You are invited to a Book Launch:

Digital Asset Ecosystems – Rethinking Crowds and Clouds

Tobias Blanke, Senior Lecturer, Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London

25th November, KCL, London, 6-8pm

Anatomy Museum, King’s Building, K6.29, King’s College London
Strand, London WC2R 2LS

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You are invited to a book launch for Tobias Blanke’s “Digital Asset Ecosystems – Rethinking Crowds and Clouds”

As a part of the event, DDH will host a seminar-discussion about the book, led by:

· Professor Sheila Anderson, Professor of e-Research, Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London: Sheila has published on data and information management and preservation, digital research repositories and the application of e-Science technologies for arts and humanities research.

· Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Professor of International Relations, Royal Holloway, University of London: Ben is co-director of the New Political Communication Unit and Co-Editor of the Sage journal Media, War & Conflict. Ben’s expertise is in the field of international political communication. Through a number of projects, books and articles he has explored how politics and security are changing in the new media ecology.

· Dr Claudia Aradau, Reader in International Politics, Department of War Studies, King’s College London: Claudia’s research has explored security practices globally and has critically interrogated their political effects. She is the editor of Security Dialogue and has published widely on critical security studies, risk and has recently worked on crowds and the datafication of security.

Refreshments will be provided.

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About the book and author:

Digital asset management is undergoing a fundamental transformation. Near universal availability of high-quality web-based assets makes it important to pay attention to the new world of digital ecosystems and what it means for managing, using and publishing digital assets. This new book by KCL Senior Lecturer Tobias Blanke, entitled “The Ecosystem of Digital Assets” reflects on these developments and what the emerging ‘web of things’ could mean for digital assets. It looks to the future of digital asset management, focussing on the next generation web, and includes up-to date developments in the field, crowd sourcing, and cloud services.

Tobias Blanke, the author, has a background in philosophy and computer science, and is currently is director of the MA in Digital Asset and Media Management for DDH. He leads several DH projects including ones involving open-source optical character recognition, open linked data, and scholarly primitives to document mining and information extraction for research. He is one of the directors of the Digital Research Infrastructure for Arts and Humanities (DARIAH), a European initiative to create an integrated research infrastructure for arts, humanities and culture heritage data, and leads research work for EHRC, an pan-European consortium to build a European Holocaust Research Infrastructure.

Seminar: Text Mining for Digital Humanities

Text Mining for Digital Humanities

Professor Timo Honkela (presented by Tuula Pääkkönen)
National Library of Finland, Helsinki
http://users.ics.aalto.fi/tho/
Tuesday, 11 November 2014, 6.00 pm
Anatomy Museum, Strand Building 6th Floor,
King’s College London, Strand London WC2R 2LS
Abstract
With the increased availability of texts in electronic form, text mining has become commonplace as an attempt to extract interesting, relevant and/or novel information from text collections in an automatic or a semi-automatic manner. Text mining tasks include, for example, categorization, clustering, topic modelling, named entity recognition, taxonomy and conceptual model creation, sentiment analysis, and document summarization. The majority of text mining research has focused on corpora that have been born digital. However, for humanities and social sciences, the digitisation and analysis of originally printed or handwritten documents is essential. These documents may contain even a large proportion of OCR errors which has to be taken into account in the subsequent analytical processes. In this presentation, text mining of historical documents is discussed in some detail. Attention is paid to the  methodological challenges caused by the noisy data, and to the future possibilities related to multilinguality and context-sensitive analysis of large collections.
 
Bio
From the beginning of 2014, professor Timo Honkela works at the Department of Modern Languages, University of Helsinki, and the National Library of Finland, Center for Preservation and Digitisation in the area of digital humanities. Before this he was the head of the Computational Cognitive Systems research group at Aalto University School of Science. With close to 200 scientific publications, Honkela has a long experience in applying statistical machine learning methods for modeling linguistic and socio-cognitive phenomena. Specific examples include leading the development of the GICA method for analyzing subjectivity of understanding, an initiating role in the development of the Websom method for visual information retrieval and text mining, and collaboration with professor George Legrady in creating Pockets Full of Memories, an interactive museum installation. Lesser known work include statistical analysis of Shakespeare’s sonnets, historical interviews, and climate conference talks, and analysis of philosophical and religious conceptions.
 
(Unfortunately, at the last minute Prof Honkela finds himself unable to be with us for his presentation.  Thus, it will instead be given by his colleague Tuula Pääkkönen).

 

Transformative Works Discussion Group

The inaugural meeting of Transformative Works Discussion Group will be *5:30, November 6th* in the Department of Digital Humanities Seminar room (second level of the KCL, Drury Lane building). We hope that the discussion group will then continue on the first Thursday of each month.

In honour of Halloween, the meeting will include a presentation: “Non-humanity Never Looked So Good: Romance From the Long Tail to the Long Tentacle”.

Anyone (students, researchers, staff etc) who has an interest in the area of fandom and transformative works, whether text, image, film, audio or transmedia, or the communities/technology that surround them are invited to attend. We hope that this discussion group will give people working in this area a chance to exchange information and ideas in a friendly, interdisciplinary setting. To this end we would also like to give people an opportunity to volunteer to do a short presentation of their work or nominate a paper for review and discussion. If you are interested in presenting or nominating a discussion topic then please email faith.lawrence@kcl.ac.uk.

Please circulate this information around your departments and to anyone else you think might be interested as these early meetings will be vital to gauging ongoing viability.

Visualising Macroscopic Deterioration of Parchment and Writing via Multispectral Images (a short report)

Monday at lunch time we gathered in the Seminar room to listen to Alejandro Giacometti’s talk about multispectral images and their potentials in helping recover data in damaged manuscripts.

Before I get into details about the talk I have to admit I don’t know much about multispectral images, nor about the physical properties of cultural heritage documents. I found my point of interest where the RGB spectrum gets broken down into smaller chunks and specific wavelength ranges, including infrared and ultraviolet, could help reveal a hidden world we thought destroyed and long gone.

After Alejandro introduced us to the project, showed us how he and his team deteriorated a deaccessioned 1753 parchment manuscript through chemical and mechanical agents to simulate damages that could occur to documents through time, he then demonstrated how multispectral images, coupled with custom metric, can help recover information and also determine what possible events the manuscripts went through.

The differences between images can be impressive, for example an image partially covered with aniline dye looks blackened to the naked eye, but would reveal a still readable text when the wavelengths are leaning towards the infrared. It’s basically like a filter was applied and the content revealed based on what you were looking for.

Imaged sample of the treated parchment.
Imaged sample of the treated parchment.

Although the results of this experiment are immediately recognisable when focusing on the text, Alejandro’s project was not specifically trying to find lost texts, but to create a register of imaging methods and wavelengths with a statistical record of how effective each was at recovering text lost to different kinds of damage.

This is new and early research, with a large potential for further work, but with the opportunity to keep the study going, Alejandro sees the potential to run more tests, combine several agents to simulate real life events to broaden and refine the metric that could give historians a very powerful tool to recover more data from cultural heritage documents, whether they were damaged by a glass of wine dropped by an absent-minded scribe, a fire in a library, their parchments scraped and used multiple times or simply because of the natural course of time.

Next month is time for a tougher audience: Alejandro will be presenting in front of the Viva committee and this is our chance to wish him good luck!

Also working on this project:

  • Alberto Campagnolo
  • Lindsay MacDonald
  • Simon Mahony
  • Melissa Terras
  • Stuart Robson
  • Tim Weyrich
  • Adam Gibson

VIRTUAL RESTORATION AND RECONSTRUCTION in a London Charter Framework

V-MusT UK Summer School

Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London, 10-20 September 2012

The UK Virtual Heritage School explores the theory and best practice in heritage visualisation. The school is offered by the Department of Digital Humanities at King’s College London, UK and is led by King’s Visualisation Lab (KVL), which specialises in the creation of digital visualisations for historical research, archaeology and cultural heritage. KVL is known for its leadership in establishing and promoting international standards for such work, most notably through the London Charter for the Computer-based Visualisation of Cultural Heritage. The School syllabus is guided by the principles of this charter. Continue reading VIRTUAL RESTORATION AND RECONSTRUCTION in a London Charter Framework