DH Seminar: Julianne Nyhan, Investigation of earliest contributions to Humanist

Were Humanists and Digital Humanities always so very different? An investigation of the earliest contributions to Humanist

Julianne Nyhan (University College London)

When: Tuesday March 3rd, 18:15 start
Where: Anatomy Museum, Strand Building 6th Floor (http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/campuses/download/KBLevel6forweb.pdf), King’s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS

Abstract: Until recently the history of Digital Humanities has, with a few notable exceptions (see, for example, relevant entries in the bibliography that I’m in the process of compiling here: https://hiddenhistories.omeka.net/resources) mostly been neglected by the DH community as well as by the mainstream Humanities. Of the many research questions that wait to be addressed, one set pertains to the history of the disciplinary formation of Digital Humanities. What processes, attitudes and circumstances (not to mention knowledge and expertise) conspired, and in what ways, to make it possible for DH to become disciplined in the ways that it has (and not in other ways)? What might answers to such questions contribute to new conversations about the forms that DH might take in the future? Here I will make a first and brief contribution to answering such far-reaching questions by identifying and analysing references to disciplinary identity that occur in conversations conducted via the Humanist Listserv in its inaugural year.

About Dr Nyhan: Dr Julianne Nyhan is lecturer in Digital Information Studies in the Department of Information Studies, University College London. Her research interests include the history of computing in the Humanities, Oral history and most aspects of digital humanities. Her recent publications include the co-edited Digital Humanities in Practice (Facet 2012) and Digital Humanities: a Reader (Ashgate 2013). She is at work on a book (Springer Verlag 2015) on the history of Digital Humanities (information about the wider Hidden Histories project is here https://hiddenhistories.omeka.net/). Having recently completed a number of interviews with the female keypunch operators who were trained by Roberto Busa in the 1950s and 1960s to work on the Index Thomisticus project she is also at work on a paper about this (see http://archelogos.hypotheses.org/135)  Among other things, she is a member of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Peer Review College, the communications Editor of Interdisciplinary Science Reviews and a member of various other editorial and advisory boards. She tweets @juliannenyhan and blogs at http://archelogos.hypotheses.org/. Further information is available here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/dis/people/juliannenyhan

Invitation to Explore the Digital Humanities

The following survey from Clare Hooper (IT Innovation Centre, Southampton), who spoke in the Digital Humanities seminar this afternoon, will contribute to her ongoing work analysing the disciplinary and thematic contributions to DH from a combination of quantitative study of published papers and response from experts. Full survey at https://www.isurvey.soton.ac.uk/14422

An Invitation to Explore the Digital Humanities

Can you spare time to help our understanding of the Digital Humanities? I’m doing a disciplinary analysis of research contributions in DH. As part of the work, I’m seeking expert input on what disciplines are represented by certain keywords. I’d be most grateful for your input.

If you have any questions, please contact me, Clare Hooper, via email: cjh@it-innovation.soton.ac.uk. Please also let me know if you’d like to be kept informed about the results of this work.

Many thanks for your time!

—Clare Hooper

CFP: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts

Conference: “On the Same Page: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts”

Date: Monday 18th – Tuesday 19th May 2015

Venue: King’s College London, Strand

Organised by: Departments of Digital Humanities and Theology & Religious Studies
Co-sponsor: Centre for Late Antique & Medieval studies, King’s College London

We are delighted to announce the Call for Papers for “On the Same Page: Digital Approaches to Hebrew Manuscripts”. This two-day conference will explore the potential for the computer-assisted study of Hebrew manuscripts, present developments in the field and share methodologies. Of course, for any of that to happen, we need some papers, so please see below for details of how to submit a proposal.

Confirmed speakers include:

Malachi Beit-Arié (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
Marc Michael Epstein (Vassar College)
Ben Outhwaite (Cambridge University Library)
Colette Sirat (Institut de Recherche et d’Histoire des Textes)

How to propose a paper

Papers of 20 minutes in length are invited on any aspect of digital approaches to the study of (medieval) Hebrew manuscripts.

Below are some possible topics, but please don’t feel limited to these:

  • the practical and theoretical consequences of the use of digital images
  • visualisation of manuscript evidence and data
  • examples of research into Hebrew manuscripts that would benefit from a Digital Humanities approach
  • computer-assisted study of iconography
  • is our increasing reliance upon digital surrogates changing our research methodologies and practices?
  • reports from projects that make use of digitised images

To propose a paper, please email a brief abstract (250 words max.) to
sephardipal@lists.cch.kcl.ac.uk

The deadline for the receipt of submissions is close of play on Friday 27th February 2015. Notice of acceptance will be sent as soon after that date as possible.

Very much looking forward to hearing from you,

Stewart Brookes and Debora Matos

Digital Classicist London 2015 call for papers

The Digital Classicist London seminars provide a forum for research into the ancient world that employs innovative digital and interdisciplinary methods. The seminars are held on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London, WC1E 7HU.

We are seeking contributions from students as well as established researchers and practitioners. We welcome papers discussing individual projects and their immediate contexts, but also wish to accommodate the broader theoretical considerations of the use of digital methods in the study of the ancient world, including ancient cultures beyond the classical Mediterranean. You should expect a mixed audience of classicists, philologists, historians, archaeologists, information scientists and digital humanists, and take particular care to cater for the presence of graduate students in the audience.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of no more than 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight GMT on March 8th, 2015.

Organised by Gabriel Bodard, Stuart Dunn, Simon Mahony and Charlotte Tupman. Further information and details of past seminars, including several peer-reviewed publications, are available at: http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/

Digital Codex Mendoza online

Ernesto Miranda, a former student on the MA in Digital Humanities here at DDH, has just published a digital edition of the Codex Mendoza, a sixteenth-century manuscript that is now one of our most important sources for pre-Hispanic culture in Mexico. The project began life as an assignment for one of his MA modules, ‘Material Culture of the Book’, for which students had to plan how they would digitise a book or set of books. After graduating, Ernesto took his plan to Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History, the Bodleian Library in Oxford, University of California Press, and King’s College London, and convinced them all to help him actually do it.

The edition is now freely available both online and as an app on the iTunes store, and has already been featured in the New York Times (among others). It allows you not only to view the pages of this famous and fascinating manuscript, but also to see in situ transcriptions, translations and supplementary material. See, for instance, this page on daily life (drag your mouse over the image to see the translation), or this one with annotations on territorial expansion.

Part of the project press-release is quoted below which gives some more background to the project. But now go, explore and enjoy!

The digital resource was created in collaboration with Bodleiain Library, Oxford, (where it has been held since 1659), King’s College London and University of California Press. It was developed in 2014, under the curatorial direction of Frances Berdan and Baltazar Brito.

The Codex Mendoza was created under the orders of Viceroy Antonio de Mendoza in 1542 to evoke an economic, political, and social panorama of the recently conquered lands. It has 72 illustrated pages glossed in Nahuatl, and 63 correspondent pages with Spanish glosses.

The Digital Codex Mendoza is part of INAH’s effort to highlight the importance of Mexican Codices for national history. This effort began in September, 2014, with the opening of the unprecedented exhibition, Códices de México, Memorias y Saberes, where 44 codices were shown for the first time to the general public. Codices are extremely sensitive documents in terms of preservation, so very few people have access to them. This is why the exhibition and the digital edition of codices held outside Mexico, such as Digital Codex Mendoza, are so important.

This effort is the first of a series that will virtually repatriate essential Mexican documents. It serves as a milestone regarding academic digital editions in Mexico and Latin America. Through this work the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (INAH), or National Institute of Anthropology and History, demonstrates the broad-based utility of this type of edition and the need to seek new forms of representation for such complex systems of knowledge. At the same time, the effort furthers the permanent calling of the INAH to study, preserve, and spread awareness of the cultural patrimony of the Mexican people, and create new ways of engagement with cultural heritage.

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 20-24, 2015

We invite applications for a 5-day training workshop on digital editing of epigraphic and papyrological texts, to be held in the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, April 20-24, 2015. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (KCL), Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig) and Charlotte Tupman (KCL). There will be no charge for the workshop, but participants should arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a community of practice and guidance for using TEI XML for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including Inscriptions of Aphrodisias, Vindolanda Tablets Online, Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri and Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri, and is also being used by Perseus Digital Library and EAGLE Europeana Project. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions in TEI, identifying and linking to external person and place authorities, and use of the tags-free Papyrological Editor (papyri.info/editor).

No technical skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek or Latin, epigraphy or papyrology, and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors and professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email simona.stoyanova@informatik.uni-leipzig.de with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant background and experience, by Friday February 27th, 2015.

Digital Humanities seminar, spring 2015

The Digital Humanities research seminar will run fortnightly, on Tuesday evenings during term, in the Anatomy Museum on the Strand campus (with one exception, on February 5, which is a lunchtime meeting in the Drury Lane 2nd floor seminar room). We hope to discuss the place of DH within the arts and humanities and within the academy as a whole. All are welcome.

When: 18:15 start (except Feb 5, 12, Mar 10, 20)
Where: Anatomy Museum, Strand Building 6th Floor
(http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/campuses/download/KBLevel6forweb.pdf)
King’s College London, Strand London WC2R 2LS (except Feb 5/Mar 10/Mar 20)

January 20, 2015:
Richard Gartner, Giles Greenway, Faith Lawrence, Jennifer Pybus (King’s College London)
Round table: Big Data in the Digital Humanities

February 5 (NB: Thursday, 13:00 start, in 26-29 Drury Lane, room 212):
Clare Hooper (University of Southampton IT Innovation Centre)
Understanding Disciplinary Presence in Interdisciplinary Fields: analysing contributions in the Digital Humanities and Web Science

February 12 (NB: Thursday, 14:00 start, in 26-29 Drury Lane, room 212):
Michael Lesk (Rutgers)
The Convergence of Curation

February 17:
Ségolène Tarte (University of Oxford)
Of Features and Models: A reflexive account of image processing experiences across classics and trauma surgery
(Joint seminar with Classics Department)

March 3:
Julianne Nyhan (University College London)
Were Humanists and Digital Humanities always so very different? An investigation of the earliest contributions to Humanist

March 10 (NB: 17:30 start, in Council Room K2.29):
Irene Polinskaya (KCL), Askold Ivantchik (Bordeaux) & Gabriel Bodard (KCL)
Byzantine Inscriptions of the Northern Black Sea (details)

March 17:
Marilyn Deegan, Simon Tanner (KCL), Sam Rayner (UCL), et alii.
Panel: Future of the Academic Book

March 20 (NB: Friday, 12:30 start, in 26-29 Drury Lane, room 212):
Nicole Coleman (Stanford)
Palladio: Visual Tools for Thinking Through Data

Linking Ancient People, Places, Objects and Texts

Linking Ancient People, Places, Objects and Texts
a round table discussion
Gabriel Bodard (KCL), Daniel Pett (British Museum), Humphrey Southall (Portsmouth), Charlotte Tupman (KCL); with response by Eleanor Robson (UCL)

18:00, Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014
Anatomy Museum, Strand Building 6th Floor
(http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/campuses/download/KBLevel6forweb.pdf)
King’s College London, Strand London WC2R 2LS

As classicists and ancient historians have become increasingly reliant on large online research tools over recent years, it has become ever more imperative to find ways of integrating those tools. Linked Open Data (LOD) has the potential to leverage both the connectivity, accessibility and universal standards of the Web, and the power, structure and semantics of relational data. This potential is being used by several scholars and projects in the area of ancient world and historical studies. The SNAP:DRGN project (snapdrgn.net) is using LOD to bring together many technically varied databases and authorities lists of ancient persons into a single virtual authority file; the Pleiades gazetteer and service projects such as Pelagios and PastPlace are creating open vocabularies for historical places and networks of references to them. Museums and other heritage institutions are at the forefront of work to encode semantic archaeological and material culture data, and projects such as Sharing Ancient Wisdoms (ancientwisdoms.ac.uk) and the Homer Multitext (homermultitext.org) are developing citation protocols and an ontology for relating texts with variants, translations and influences.

The panel will introduce some of these key projects and concepts, and then the audience will be invited to participate in open discussion of the issues and potentials of Linked Ancient World Data.

Book Launch: Digital Asset Ecosystems – Rethinking Crowds and Clouds

You are invited to a Book Launch:

Digital Asset Ecosystems – Rethinking Crowds and Clouds

Tobias Blanke, Senior Lecturer, Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London

25th November, KCL, London, 6-8pm

Anatomy Museum, King’s Building, K6.29, King’s College London
Strand, London WC2R 2LS

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You are invited to a book launch for Tobias Blanke’s “Digital Asset Ecosystems – Rethinking Crowds and Clouds”

As a part of the event, DDH will host a seminar-discussion about the book, led by:

· Professor Sheila Anderson, Professor of e-Research, Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London: Sheila has published on data and information management and preservation, digital research repositories and the application of e-Science technologies for arts and humanities research.

· Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Professor of International Relations, Royal Holloway, University of London: Ben is co-director of the New Political Communication Unit and Co-Editor of the Sage journal Media, War & Conflict. Ben’s expertise is in the field of international political communication. Through a number of projects, books and articles he has explored how politics and security are changing in the new media ecology.

· Dr Claudia Aradau, Reader in International Politics, Department of War Studies, King’s College London: Claudia’s research has explored security practices globally and has critically interrogated their political effects. She is the editor of Security Dialogue and has published widely on critical security studies, risk and has recently worked on crowds and the datafication of security.

Refreshments will be provided.

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About the book and author:

Digital asset management is undergoing a fundamental transformation. Near universal availability of high-quality web-based assets makes it important to pay attention to the new world of digital ecosystems and what it means for managing, using and publishing digital assets. This new book by KCL Senior Lecturer Tobias Blanke, entitled “The Ecosystem of Digital Assets” reflects on these developments and what the emerging ‘web of things’ could mean for digital assets. It looks to the future of digital asset management, focussing on the next generation web, and includes up-to date developments in the field, crowd sourcing, and cloud services.

Tobias Blanke, the author, has a background in philosophy and computer science, and is currently is director of the MA in Digital Asset and Media Management for DDH. He leads several DH projects including ones involving open-source optical character recognition, open linked data, and scholarly primitives to document mining and information extraction for research. He is one of the directors of the Digital Research Infrastructure for Arts and Humanities (DARIAH), a European initiative to create an integrated research infrastructure for arts, humanities and culture heritage data, and leads research work for EHRC, an pan-European consortium to build a European Holocaust Research Infrastructure.

Seminar: Text Mining for Digital Humanities

Text Mining for Digital Humanities

Professor Timo Honkela (presented by Tuula Pääkkönen)
National Library of Finland, Helsinki
http://users.ics.aalto.fi/tho/
Tuesday, 11 November 2014, 6.00 pm
Anatomy Museum, Strand Building 6th Floor,
King’s College London, Strand London WC2R 2LS
Abstract
With the increased availability of texts in electronic form, text mining has become commonplace as an attempt to extract interesting, relevant and/or novel information from text collections in an automatic or a semi-automatic manner. Text mining tasks include, for example, categorization, clustering, topic modelling, named entity recognition, taxonomy and conceptual model creation, sentiment analysis, and document summarization. The majority of text mining research has focused on corpora that have been born digital. However, for humanities and social sciences, the digitisation and analysis of originally printed or handwritten documents is essential. These documents may contain even a large proportion of OCR errors which has to be taken into account in the subsequent analytical processes. In this presentation, text mining of historical documents is discussed in some detail. Attention is paid to the  methodological challenges caused by the noisy data, and to the future possibilities related to multilinguality and context-sensitive analysis of large collections.
 
Bio
From the beginning of 2014, professor Timo Honkela works at the Department of Modern Languages, University of Helsinki, and the National Library of Finland, Center for Preservation and Digitisation in the area of digital humanities. Before this he was the head of the Computational Cognitive Systems research group at Aalto University School of Science. With close to 200 scientific publications, Honkela has a long experience in applying statistical machine learning methods for modeling linguistic and socio-cognitive phenomena. Specific examples include leading the development of the GICA method for analyzing subjectivity of understanding, an initiating role in the development of the Websom method for visual information retrieval and text mining, and collaboration with professor George Legrady in creating Pockets Full of Memories, an interactive museum installation. Lesser known work include statistical analysis of Shakespeare’s sonnets, historical interviews, and climate conference talks, and analysis of philosophical and religious conceptions.
 
(Unfortunately, at the last minute Prof Honkela finds himself unable to be with us for his presentation.  Thus, it will instead be given by his colleague Tuula Pääkkönen).